160m jt65

6H6IARU - K5KLA 160m JT65, April 18, 2012

6H6IARU (special call for World Radio Amateur Day) in qso with K5KLA in 160m band in JT65 mode; operator Tony, XE1GRR. Date: 18-April-2012 Equipment: Yaesu F...

6H6IARU - K5KLA 160m JT65 April 18 2012
Rating: 5.00/5 [Total raters: 1]

160m JT65

And some 6m FM in the background.

160m JT65

JT65 on the amateur bands with many logs may 13th 2013

sq3llj - w6oa/7 - n4ay - ac7sg - ha2al - nm0lgs - ki7yk and others in this contact.

JT65 on the amateur bands with many logs may 13th 2013
Rating: 5.00/5 [Total raters: 1]

G59-JT65-20M-10mW.MOV

Great digital mode. Running 10mW using Genesis G59 SDR. Great rig! Great fun!

G59-JT65-20M-10mW MOV
Rating: 5.00/5 [Total raters: 1]

Fun with Tannerite

Fun with Tannerite

160 Meter Noise

0.5 mS per division. S 9 on the S meter.

160 Meter Noise

3CPX5000A7 / YC-179 10-160m Amplifier

NEW YC-179 AMPLIFIER. 10-160M CONSTRUCTION DETAILS ON MY WEBSITE. www.qsl.net/kf8od.

3CPX5000A7 YC-179 10-160m Amplifier
Rating: 5.00/5 [Total raters: 4]

SoftRock RXTXv6.2 - 160m Initial Test

SoftRock RXTXv6.2 receiving signals on the 160 meter amateur band, using "Rocky" software. On this second step of my "SDR journey" I learn the importance of ...

SoftRock RXTXv6 2 - 160m Initial Test
Rating: 5.00/5 [Total raters: 9]

6H6IARU in qso CE3FZ - XE3N 10m FM

6H6IARU (special call for World Radio Amateur Day) in qso with CE3FZ and XE3N in 10m band in FM mode; operator Tony, XE1GRR. Date: 17-April-2012 Equipment: Y...

6H6IARU in qso CE3FZ - XE3N 10m FM

Travel

Playing with the new Sanyo VPC-HD100. The instructions say not to use it in a moving vehicle, so naturally I had to do it. Produced with cyberlink powerdirector.

Travel
Rating: 5.00/5 [Total raters: 1]
Wikipedia about: 160m jt65

History



As the high frequency bands were developed in mid-1920s — along with their smaller, more convenient antennas — 160 meters fell into a period of relative nonuse. Although there has always been activity on the band, fewer and fewer hams are willing (or able, due to lack of sufficient real estate) to put up the antennas necessary to take advantage of the band's unique properties. For most amateurs, the HF bands are much easier to use and HF antennas need a lot less real estate.

After World War II, the 160 meter band was apparently not coming back. A large part of the U.S. 160 meter band was allocated on a primary basis to the LORAN radio-navigation system that began operating in and around the 160 meter band in 1942. Amateurs were relegated to secondary, non-interfering status, with severe regional power limitations and restricted day/night operations on just a few narrow segments of the band.

Many older hams recall, with no great fondness, the…
Read more: Wikipedia