Seraph crystals

Wikipedia about: Seraph crystals

Origins and development

The word seraphim, literally "burning ones", transliterates a Hebrew plural noun; translation yields seraphs. The word saraph/seraphim appears three times in the Torah (Numbers 21:6–8, Deuteronomy 8:15) and four times in the Book of Isaiah (6:2–6, 14:29, 30:6). In Numbers and Deuteronomy the "seraphim" are serpents—the association of serpents as "burning ones" is possibly due to the burning sensation of the poison. Isaiah also uses the word in close association with words to describe snakes (nachash, the generic word for snakes, in 14:29, and epheh, viper, in 30:6).

The Isaiah vision of seraphs in an idealised Jerusalem for the prophet by touching his lips with a live coal from the altar (verses 6–7). The text uses the word "seraphim" but adds no adjectives or modifiers emphasizing snakes (nahash, etc.). The description gives the creatures both human and avian attributes. A strong association with fire, though, is maintained.

In the Hebrew Bible the seraphs do not have the status of angels. It is only in later sources (like De Coelesti Hierarchia or Summa Theologiae that they are considered to be a division of the divine messengers.

Seraphs appear in the 2nd-century BC Book of Enoch where they are designated as drakones (δράκονες "serpents"), and are mentioned, in conjunction with , as the heavenly creatures standing nearest to the throne of God. Two other classes of celestial beings were equated with the seraphim - the phoenixes and the











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